4 Tips to Avoid a Disaster in Buying a Wall Map

Buying a wall map that shows street-level detail can be one of the trickiest tasks a small business faces, especially if the buyer is geographically challenged.For some businesses, a good local wall map may make the difference between a flat bottom line and one that bulges upward a little.Few buyers know it, but the task of buying a map for the wall is loaded with possibilities of making a mistake that the purchaser later will regret. The job is not as simple as reaching for a can of beans on a shelf at your local supermarket.

Here are 10 tips to help the buyer avoid a disaster:

  1. Know what job you want the map to do.
  • Does it cover the territory you need covered?
  • What features do you want the map to show?
  • Do you want a pretty map or a useful map? Color? Black/white?
  • What size do you seek? Will it fit your wall?
  • Is the method of hanging important? (rails? rollers? eyelets? nothing?)
  • Is lamination necessary, or would you accept paper if available? (Most maps for the wall are not available in paper, because the publisher can’t make enough money to support its business by selling paper maps.)
  1. Be willing to compromise.

There is no such thing as a perfect map. Be aware that the business of publishing a map Рany map Рis extremely complex. Partly because of this, as an example, every map sold to businesses is out of date on the day it comes off the press. 4f-pvp  And the longer it sits unsold on a shelf, the less current its information is. The key questions the buyer needs to ask: Does this map do the job for me? Or are there better alternatives?

  1. Know your publisher.

Publishers come in all kinds of stripes. No two are alike. Each publisher has its own methods, its own goals, its own priorities. And different publishers focus on different markets, serving different clientele. Make sure the publisher you choose focuses on your needs as a customer.

Don’t buy a map just because the publisher is a household name. That publisher may not serve the market you’re in, and the map offered by that publisher likely won’t serve your needs. Example: If you’re not part of the market that includes tourists, you don’t want to choose a street-level-detail product for your wall produced by a publisher whose primary market is tourists.While you may want to avoid a publisher that is a household name, it’s not wise to choose a publisher you’ve never heard of.

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